Recent Posts

Ready for a Travel Rewards card? Here’s What You Need to Know

Ready for a Travel Rewards card? Here’s What You Need to Know

If you’re trying to save money on travel in the next year, chances are good that getting a travel rewards card is on your mind. When used with enough frequency and foresight, these cards can be used to save hundreds of dollars on airfare, hotels and ground transportation. But getting a travel rewards card isn’t always the right idea, and when it is, there are so many to choose from.

What is a credit score and how is it calculated?

What is a credit score and how is it calculated?

Your credit score is a three-digit number that potential lenders use to determine your creditworthiness. It’s designed to indicate how likely you are to repay a loan in a timely fashion. A higher score reflects a lower risk of delinquency and gives lenders the confidence they need to offer mortgages, car loans, lower interest rates and higher credit limits.

Trim Insights: 7 in 10 Spent Money on Travel in the Last Year

Trim Insights: 7 in 10 Spent Money on Travel in the Last Year

In an effort to learn more about who is spending on travel and how they’re spending, we dove into the more than 500 million transactions of our users from across the United States. We analyzed travel spending by user location, age, income and credit tier to get a full picture of how travel plays a role in users’ spending habits.

How to Get Approved for a Credit Card

How to Get Approved for a Credit Card

Applying for a credit card has become so easy that it can be done in a matter of minutes. Just visit the card’s website, submit your information and wait for the credit card issuer to get back to you. You should receive a decision within a few days, sometimes even instantly. However, before you apply you’ll want to take careful stock of your credit history and score so that you can maximize your chances of approval.

Types of Savings Accounts: Where to Put Your Extra Money

Types of Savings Accounts: Where to Put Your Extra Money

If you have cash that you don’t intend to spend any time soon, it’s a great idea to open up a savings account. Depending on which type of account you choose, the money you put into savings can accrue interest at a rate of 1-3% per year while still remaining easily accessible if you need an extra bit of funds.

How to Plan an Affordable Vacation

How to Plan an Affordable Vacation

After working full-time for months (even years) without a well-earned break, it’s essential that we take a few days to step back and decompress. But sometimes, the prospect of actually going somewhere for a proper vacation seems financially impossible: airfare, lodging and food for a mere week out of town can add up quickly.

Gone Camping: How to Plan a Camping Trip on a Budget

Gone Camping: How to Plan a Camping Trip on a Budget

Camping trips are the most affordable way to take a vacation. Here are a few tips for keeping costs low if you’re planning on spending some time in the great outdoors this summer.

4 Ways To Survive Wedding Season Without Breaking the Bank

4 Ways To Survive Wedding Season Without Breaking the Bank

Even if you’re not a bridesmaid or groomsman, attending a wedding is almost never cheap: we’re expected to purchase gifts, get ourselves to the celebration and find a place to stay, all while dressing to the nines. But if a busy wedding season and the pretty penny it might cost are keeping you up at night, there are a few tricks to contain costs and allay your fears.

How to Save Money on Your July 4th Party

How to Save Money on Your July 4th Party

With July 4th right around the corner, a lot of us are planning to celebrate the anniversary of American independence by having over friends and family for a party. Whether it’s a yearly tradition or your first time hosting, here are some easy ways to make sure that your Independence Day extravaganza is both fun and affordable.

7 Financial Mistakes for New Grads to Avoid

7 Financial Mistakes for New Grads to Avoid

Graduating from college is a big step in your life. Unfortunately, it’s also a time when many new grads make some pretty big financial missteps. Here are seven of the most common to avoid: